Music Theory Chords

Notes

C C# D D# E F F# G G# B C
r(1) . 2(9) . 3 4(11) . 5 . 6(13) 7

Guitar Fretboard

0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15
3 4 . 5 . 6 . 7 1 . 2 . 3 4 . 5
7 1 . 2 . 3 4 . 5 . 6 . 7 1 . 2
5 . 6 . 7 1 . 2 . 3 4 . 5 . 6 .
2 . 3 4 . 5 . 6 . 7 1 . 2 . 3 4
6 . 7 1 . 2 . 3 4 . 5 . 6 . 7 1
3 4 . 5 . 6 . 7 1 . 2 . 3 4 . 5

Chords Triads

  I III V
maj r 3 5
m r b3 5
dim r b3 b5
aug r 3 #5

7’s

name  
(dominant) 7 maj + b7
maj7 maj + 7
m7 m + b7
dim7 dim + bb7
half-dim 7 dim + b7

Extentions

Add the 9, 11, and 13th. Theoretically they are piled up, as in examples bellow, but in practice some notes are omited when adding these extensions. Otherwise they become dissonant or even impossible to play(depending on instrument).

Examples:

name  
maj9 maj7 + 9
m11 m9 + 11
13 11 + 13

Inversions

Its about changing the order of the notes in sequence of a chord, its usefull for: Arrange bass/treble lines, on a chord progression. Different flavors of the same chord. Get reasonable fingerings.

Naming

name  
maj major
m minor
dim diminuished
aug augmented

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